Mostly harmless

Turner, M.W. (2005). The thief. New York: Greenwillow. (First published 1996.) Genre: Fantasy Intended audience: Tweens / young teens Personal reaction to the book: The thief got the Douglas Adams review: Mostly harmless. You have read better fantasies; you have read worse fantasies. It is appropriate for younger teens / tweens and is a safe… Continue reading Mostly harmless

Tapping at my chamber door

Stiefvater, M. (2012). The raven boys. New York: Scholastic. Genre: Supernatural, adventure Intended audience: Mid-teens and up. Personal reaction to the book: Loved it. Well-rounded characters, believable motivations, good dialogue; by turns funny and emotionally satisfying. It does not talk down to its audience. The only book for the course thus far (out of six)… Continue reading Tapping at my chamber door

He’s a magic man

Scott, M. (2007). The Alchemyst: The secrets of the immortal Nicholas Flamel. New York: Delacorte. Genre: Fantasy Intended audience: Teens/young adults Personal reaction to the book: This is a worthy follow-up to J. K. Rowling for YA readers who have memorized Harry Potter and are looking for another fantasy series to pick up. Scott has… Continue reading He’s a magic man

Here be drag … (yawns)

Paolini, C. (2003). Eragon. New York: A.E. Knopf Genre: Fantasy Intended audience: Tweens through mid-teens Personal reaction to the book: A remarkable achievement for a teenage author and my kid loves it. From an adult perspective, it is a paint-by-numbers fantasy title. The protagonist is more than a little self-centered, even for a YA book,… Continue reading Here be drag … (yawns)

Taken for a Ride

Patterson, J. (2005). The angel experiment (Maximum Ride #1). New York: Little, Brown & Co. Genre: Fantasy /¬†adventure Intended audience: General YA Personal reaction to the book: It's a crap book, but it's a crap book aimed carefully at a demographic that undoubtedly loves it. The extensive, repeated descriptions of flying and escaping the bad… Continue reading Taken for a Ride

Mouseketeers rerun?

Jacques, B. (2007). Redwall: The graphic novel. New York: Philomel. Genre: Graphic novel / fantasy Intended audience: Younger teens Personal reaction to the book: Meh. The art isn't particularly striking or groundbreaking. In fact, it reminds me of the art from the animated TV series but with heavier inking. The story is also familiar to… Continue reading Mouseketeers rerun?

Pastel sunsets

Meyer, S. (2006). Twilight. New York: Little, Brown & Co. Genre: Fantasy / romance Intended audience: Girls, early to mid-teens Personal reaction to the book: Given all the froth around the movies, I didn't have particularly high hopes for this one, but figured I should know what the fuss was about. It's a very solid… Continue reading Pastel sunsets

The movie was better

Goldman, W. (2003). The princess bride: 30th anniversary edition. New York: Ballantine. Genre: Fantasy / romance / adventure Intended audience: Everyone Personal reaction to the book: The movie was better. First time I've written that. On the second complete read, one of the problems is the layers of prefaces and extra chapters, etc., accreted over… Continue reading The movie was better

Ghastly good read

Gaiman, N. (2008). The graveyard book. New York: HarperCollins. Genre: Thriller, fantasy Intended audience: Mid-teens and up. Personal reaction to the book: Neal Gaiman is a genius (I keep writing that in reviewing his work). I was wondering what made this a YA book, but when I thought about it, it's a simple story of… Continue reading Ghastly good read

All wet

Blakemore, M.F. (2013). The water castle. New York: Walker. Genre: Fantasy Intended audience: Tweens and young teens. Personal reaction to the book: A hugely detailed world, well thought out and rendered. Extremely slow-moving for the age group and full of historical and scientific material well beyond the target age group. The author has avoided romance… Continue reading All wet